Evening patrons take to the bar and dining room of Cafe Poca Cosa, 110 E. Pennington Street, in 2014.

Monthslong quarantines, coupled with a general lack of consumer confidence have left independent restaurants hanging by a thread. 

Here are three ways you can help support local restaurants, beyond buying takeout: 

  • Check out Thirst's website and find out more about becoming a community organizer for Tucson. This grassroots organization is trying to make COVID-19 a valid claim for business interruption insurance, which would require insurance companies to pay out to local restaurants. If you're interested in more information, contact DeFeo at aaron@littleritualsbar.com.

"It’s not an either/or proposition. People should do all of these things," says Arizona bartender Aaron DeFeo, an advocate for independent restaurants across the state.

Keep this resource bookmarked because knowledge is power. Below you'll see a list of every local restaurant that has made it public that they are permanently shutting down. Have I missed one? Email me at aberlin@tucson.com.

Café Poca Cosa 

Evening patrons walk through the front door of Cafe Poca Cosa in 2014.

This nationally-celebrated Mexican restaurant had been in downtown Tucson since the mid-1980s, and grew into a symbol of our food scene. Owner Suzana Davila closed Café Poca Cosa when the quarantines started in March, and only recently announced the permanent closure via press release. “Clearly, this is not how I imagined my business would culminate. I always envisioned passing the business on to my hard-working children, who have been actively involved in the business for many years,” it read. Read more. 

Green Feet Brewing

This southside brewery has been in business since 2016, owned by Air Force veteran Scott Petersen and partner Jen Reynard. They announced back in mid-August that they'd close Oct. 16 or "when the beer ran out," wrote Cathalena E. Burch in the Star. Located in an industrial park near Davis-Monthan Airforce Base, the small spot had an intimate vibe and a neighborhood bar atmosphere. 

The Meet Rack

Jim Anderson, owner of the Meet Rack, 210 W. Drachman St., in 2007 with his trademark staff and vehicle license plate, which reads “GOD.”

One of Tucson's most "eclectic" dive bars, The Meet Rack was known for its pitchers of mixed drinks, the owner who called himself God and the branding iron he used on his customers. When the bar permanently closed in October, owner Jim Anderson had branded a total of 3,545 people with a likeness of his own face, including four people who came just to be branded on the last day. RIP. Read more. 

Perfecto's Mexican Grill Express

Perfecto Leon’s second family restaurant, in a former Sonic Drive-In at 1055 E. Irvington Road, is gone, but his restaurant on South 12th Avenue is still going strong.

This spinoff of the popular South Twelfth Avenue restaurant was forced to close its doors after almost three years on Park and Irvington. Housed in an old Sonic drive-in, Perfecto's Express was a more casual version of the original restaurant where you could customize your own dishes similar to a Chipotle. The original Perfecto's is still going strong. Read more

Public Brewhouse

Public Brewhouse, 209 N. Hoff Ave., closed its doors after a five-year run because of the pandemic.

For five years, Public Brewhouse was a hidden gem nanobrewery tucked back off Fourth Avenue. The bar did most of its business in person, and didn't sell its beers in markets around town. When the pandemic hit, they were losing money by just doing takeout, so they decided to close their doors for good in October. Read more

Rincon Market

Shopper Rebecca Cramer browses the aisles of the newly re-opened Rincon Market, 2513 E. Sixth St. in Tucson, after a fire shuttered the business in 2013.

This 94-year-old market was forced to close its doors in early June when the current owners were locked out by landlords for failure to pay rent. It was most recently owned by Peter Wilke of Time Market, who decided to temporarily close at the beginning of the pandemic. The market had one of the best cheese and fish counters in Tucson. Read more.

Alibaba Mediterranean

Alibaba Mediterranean was a casual spot for falafel plates and more at 2545 E. Speedway. 

Alibaba was the go-to spot in the campus area for Persian and Middle Eastern staples like falafel, meat kabobs and unique items like sabzi beef stew. They also had a substantial vegetarian menu, which made them popular with the student crowd. They shut their doors in June, emptying out their space and taking down the colorful sign in front. Read more. 

Athens on 4th Ave.

A shuttered Athens on 4th at North Fourth Avenue and East University Boulevard. Owner Andreas Delfakis closed his business after 27 years of serving authentic Greek seafood alongside dolmathes and moussaka.

Owner Andreas Delfakis closed his doors June 20 after almost three decades of business. Athens on 4th Ave. was once one of Tucson's most popular upscale restaurants, but had suffered a series of blows including prolonged construction during the development of the Fourth Avenue Streetcar. Athens was known for its Greek specialties, like moussaka and flaming saganaki. Read more.  

Bianchi's in Marana

Bianchi’s owner Vincent Bianchi said the Marana restaurant, above, was picking up steam after years of struggle, but “we cannot overcome COVID-19.”

The second location of the popular westside Italian restaurant was inside a 7,000-square foot building that was most recently home to a steakhouse. Bianchi's Marana outpost was doing well up until the pandemic started, but then it all ground to a halt. "It's such a beautiful building. It’s just not meant to be a pickup and delivery place," said owner Vincent Bianchi in a recent Arizona Daily Star article. "It’s not what anybody wanted. One day you're jamming and then nothing.” He closed his doors March 31. Read more. 

Chicago Bar

The owners of Chicago Bar, a fixture for Tucson blues fans and musicians alike since 1978, announced the closure on Facebook, saying the financial burden of being mostly closed since March 17 took an irreversible toll.

Chicago Bar had been a staple in the local music scene since 1978, and had hosted countless blues concerts, reggae dance parties and karaoke sessions. But the business wasn't able to survive being mostly closed for several months when the pandemic hit in March. Owners posted on Facebook in late June that they would not be reopening. Read more. 

Gee's Garden

Gee's Garden has been at the center of Tucson's dim sum culture for several decades. 

Gee's Garden was the first Chinese buffet in the state of Arizona when it opened in 1975, said owner Joan Gee. But the restaurant was most popular for its traditional dim sum service, which it started in 1995. The restaurant was forced to close in June after the new owner Eddie Lau fell behind on rent. Read more. 

Mestizos

Mestizos is located in the former Manna from Heaven space at St. Mary's and Grande. 

This contemporary Mexican restaurant opened in a small building on St. Mary's Road and Grande last November. The business wasn't open long enough to gain the momentum, and on April 2 the owners posted on Facebook that they were closing. Fortunately, you can still visit their sister restaurant Machi in Nogales, Arizona. 

Rigo’s on Oracle 

Owner Rigoberto Lopez knows others have expanded from the south side and downtown with mixed success, but conversations with customers convinced him the site at 5851 N. Oracle Road, above, is a good idea.

A sign of new eating trends brought on by the pandemic, the southside icon Rigo's was forced to close its second location on Oracle Road. Rigo's is known for its daily all-you-can-eat buffet, which just didn't work during the time of COVID. The owners announced they were closing May 15, after almost 10 years at that location. "Lots of great memories have been made. We hope to see you, and continue to be make even more memories in our south location and Benson location," reads the Facebook post


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