A participant of the 2019 Tucson Women's March holds a sign while marching up Alameda Street.

Thousands of Tucsonans took to the streets of downtown, Sunday, Jan. 20, as part of the Tucson Women's March.

The march's mission is to "harness the political power of diverse women and their communities to create transformative social change" and featured a number of speakers and performers from the Tucson community

This year, Tohono O'odham toka players and indigenous women led the march. Toka is a Tohono O'odham sport that's similar to hockey and played by women.

It all kicked off around 10 a.m. in Jácome Plaza with speakers, including an introduction by Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild and a poem by Tohono O'odham poet Ofelia Zepeda.

The march began at 11 a.m. and started north on Stone Avenue, moved west on Franklin Street, south on Grande Avenue and east on Alemeda Street before ending back in Jácome Plaza.

Here are some of the best, funny, thoughtful and powerful signs spotted during the event.

Holding their u'usaga sticks used in playing their native game called toka, Tohono O'odham women wait to begin the 2019 Tucson Women's March. Tohono O'odham women led thousands of people on a march that took them through the downtown area. Toka is a game only Tohono O'odham play. The mission of the march, a women-led movement providing education on a number of issues, was to harness the political power of diverse women and their communities to create change.

A proud mother carries a sign during the 2019 Tucson Women's March. Tohono O'odham women led thousands of people on a march that took them through the downtown area. The mission of the march, a women-led movement providing education on a number of issues, was to harness the political power of diverse women and their communities to create change.

Thousands walk carrying a variety of signs during the 2019 Tucson Women's March. Tohono O'odham women led thousands of people on a march that took them through the downtown area. The mission of the march, a women-led movement providing education on a number of issues, was to harness the political power of diverse women and their communities to create change.

A Tucson Women's March participant hold at sign that says "We need to be the women that RGB fights for us to be."

Lauren Escobar, 13-week-old Aurelia Escobar, Gabriela Woody and Leonora Escobar hold their signs at the 2019 Tucson Women's March.

After having a problem deciding which protest sign she wanted to carry, Kathryn Pelligrini carries several attached to her umbrella during the 2019 Tucson Women's March. Tohono O'odham women led thousands of people on a march that took them through the downtown area. The mission of the march, a women-led movement providing education on a number of issues, was to harness the political power of diverse women and their communities to create change.

A participant of the Tucson Women's March holds a sign that reads "YES we can, NOW we have to."

Participants walk past the old Pima County Courthouse during the 2019 Tucson Women's March. Tohono O'Odham women lead the thousands of people on a march that took them through the downtown area. The mission of the march, a women-led movement providing education on a number of issues, was to harness the political power of diverse women and their communities to create change.

A participant of the Women's March Tucson holds a sign that says "I don't know about YOU, but I'm FEELING 22 cents UNDERPAID."

Members of a Tohono O'odham toka team hold signs at the 2019 Tucson Women's March near the Joel D. Valdez Main Library in downtown Tucson. Toka is a Tohono O'odham sport that's similar to hockey and played by women.

Signs spotted downtown at the 2019 Tucson Women's March.

Esmeralda Montaño, Sharron Alvarez, Rachel Alvarez, Magdalena Alvarez and Catalina Gallego hold the signs they made at the 2019 Tucson Women's March.

A sign that reads "SMASH THE PATRIARCHY" hangs on a crosswalk sign at the 2019 Tucson Women's March.

A woman holding a sign that says "You are not forgotten" at the Tucson Women's March.

Sign spotted at the 2019 Tucson Women's March.

Signs spotted at the 2019 Tucson Women's March.

A Wonder Woman sign seen at the 2019 Tucson Women's March.

A participant holds signs at the 2019 Tucson Women's March in Jácome Plaza. G.O.A.T is an acronym for "greatest of all time."

Sign spotted at the 2019 Tucson Women's March.