Wild Katz

Wild Katz will have climbing walls, obstacle courses, toddler slides and a ball blaster arena with spiral slides and tunnels.

A new indoor playspace for kids is opening on the east side this fall.

Indoor playground Wild Katz is expected to open by November at 4629 E. Speedway in the Mission Plaza at North Swan Road.

Designed for children from 6 months to early teens, Wild Katz will have climbing walls, obstacle courses, toddler slides and a ball blaster arena with spiral slides and tunnels with seating areas for parents to keep an eye on the kiddos.

There will be a centrally located, old-fashioned soda fountain with ice cream, television sets, massage chairs and couches.

It was during a visit to an indoor playground last year that Wild Katz owner Jenni Gardner got the idea of replicating the concept.

“The parent is our true client,” says owner Jenni Gardner.

Six party rooms, themed as a different cat — tiger, jaguar, leopard, cheetah, bobcat and lynx — will be available for 90-minute rentals that include use of the playground.

Prices are being calculated and will be posted on wldktz.com as the opening nears.

It was during a visit to an indoor playground last year that the mother of four got the idea of replicating the concept.

“I sat there and thought, ‘How does Tucson not have one of these?’” Gardner said. “I couldn’t stop thinking about it.”

Hibachi Super Buffet, 4629 E. Speedway Blvd., left all equipment when the business closed. A new business, Wild Katz, has taken over the space. Wild Katz is an indoor adventure playground for kids ages 6 months to 13 years old.

Looking for space in central Tucson, her broker showed her the 15,562-square-foot space that was once occupied by Hibachi Super Buffet.

“It looked like they had left mid-shift,” Gardner laughed. “There were plates, napkins and soy sauce everywhere.”

The space is now cleaned up and ready for equipment to be installed. 

Contact reporter Gabriela Rico at grico@tucson.com. On Facebook: Facebook.com/DailyStarBiz

Reporter

Gabriela's newspaper career began at the Tucson Citizen in '86 as the "movie-times girl" where she'd call local theaters for showtimes. Since then, she's written about crime, education, immigration, trade and business. She's been with the Star since 2007.